Health Professionals
Baby with spoon in mouth

Feed your baby the common allergy causing foods such as peanut, egg, tree nuts, and cow's milk before your baby is one year of age.

About the National Allergy Strategy

In the last 20 years, Australia and other developed countries have experienced a significant increase in chronic allergic diseases.

The result is a high demand for appropriate medical care, a reduction in quality of life for those with allergic diseases and their carers, and a rise in the economic cost of care.

Currently affecting more than 4 million Australians, the rapid and continuing rise of allergic diseases has become a serious public health issue requiring action by all levels of government and the community.

To address these issues, leading medical and patient allergy organisations, the Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy (ASCIA) and Allergy & Anaphylaxis Australia (A&AA), have developed the first National Allergy Strategy for Australia in collaboration with other stakeholder organisations.

An important guiding principle for the National Allergy Strategy is to be patient and consumer focused, and this is reflected in the Mission Statement.

To improve the health and quality of life of Australians with allergic diseases, and minimise the burden of allergic diseases on individuals, their carers, healthcare services and the community.

Goals of the National Allergy Strategy

Standards of Care
Develop standards of care to improve the health and quality of life of people with allergic diseases.

Access to Care
Ensure timely access to appropriate healthcare management for people with allergic diseases.

Information, Education and Training
Improve access to best-practice, evidence-based and consistent information, education and training on allergic diseases for health professionals, people with allergic diseases, consumers, carers and the community.

Research
Promote patient-focused research to prevent the development of allergic diseases and improve the health and quality of life of people with allergic diseases.

Prioritised Chronic Disease
Recognition of allergic diseases as a prioritised chronic disease and National Health Priority Area.

About the Food Allergy Prevention Project

The National Allergy Strategy received funding from the Australian government to implement a food allergy prevention project based on the ASCIA guidelines for infant feeding and allergy prevention and was created in consultation with key stakeholder organisations.

The project aims to:

  • Encourage parents to introduce the common allergy causing foods to their baby within the first year of life
  • Provide information and support to help parents feed their baby the common allergy causing foods
  • Provide an information and support line to help answer any questions parents may have about feeding their baby the common allergy causing foods, including questions from health professionals
  • Provide information and support to help parents manage their baby’s eczema to help prevent food allergy developing
  • Provide information and support for health professionals about current infant feeding recommendations to prevent babies developing food allergy
  • Provide information and support for health professionals about optimising eczema management to prevent food allergy developing
  • Provide answers to frequently asked questions about how to prevent food allergy.

The Nip Allergies in the Bub website is an initiative of the National Allergy Strategy Food Allergy Prevention Project.

This project received funding from the Australian Government Department of Health.